Friday, March 20, 2020

Free Essays on International Business

ADCP International Marketing/Special Studies 1. a. Customers are the focal point of all marketing activities. Organizations have to define products not as what they make or produce but as what they do to satisfy customers. Marketing Barbie dolls would require a marketer to consider the socioculture of its consumers. Sociocultural forces are the influences in a society and its culture that bring about change in attitudes, beliefs, norms, customs, and lifestyles. There are three issues that need to be addressed in decided who will purchase a Barbie doll in international markets. First, there are constant changes in population demographic characteristics-age, gender, race, and ethnicity. The U. S. has entered into another baby boom, with 76 million Americans aged 18 or younger. Other nations may have this same occurrence and this information would help in directing attention to those areas that have a high representation of children wanting a Barbie doll. Another population trend is the increasing multicultural nature of U .S. society. The number of immigrants into the United States has steadily risen during the last thirty years, thus, the emergence of cultures emulating the U.S. Another thing to consider would be the modification of marketing practices to reach ethnically diverse customers to eliminate language barriers. Second, cultural values need to be addressed so that marketers can try to monitor changes in consumers’ needs for Barbie dolls and its products (clothes, accessories, etc.) in the near future. For instance, Barbie dolls were very popular when I was younger (not that I played with them, I had a sister) and today, they are not because of increased competition of other toy and doll makers. Video games have also become very popular in favor of toys. b. When marketing beer internationally, a marketer may have to consider the political/legal environment of the country they are trying to solicit. Some politic... Free Essays on International Business Free Essays on International Business The term Globalization was first coined in the 1980’s. However, the definition of globalization varies in cultural, economical, environmental, political and social studies. According to Williamson, globalization in economical studies refers to an increasing integration of the global economy through factor and product markets by way of direct investment, financial flow and trade greatly aided by the deregulation of markets as well as the liberation of capital movement and trade (Williamson 1998,1). It is a driving force that is expected to affect the countries well being in terms of trade, employment and income as well as the values of dollar in relative to other currencies and so on. Based on a study on the globalization’s rankings in the world, New Zealand is currently rank at number 23. (Graham, Crocombe. Michael, Enright and Michael, Porter 1991,12) In the following paragraphs, there will be an explanation how the globalization affects the New Zealand’s trade with other countries, especially for multinational company’s competition in international trade, employment opportunities for New Zealanders and some reasons which are beneficial and harmful to New Zealand as a whole as well as some policies that should be taken into consideration by other businesses and the government in order to benefit from it. According to the definition of globalization above, it also is simply to understand that globalization refers to the shift a more integrated and interdependent world economy. Globalization has two main components: the globalization of markets and the globalization of production (Charles, Hill 2003,6). The globalization of markets means each the merging of distinct and separate national markets into one huge global marketplace. Each country can sell its products internationally by falling trade barriers. It provides a chance for local companies to compete in international trade by offering qualified goods and services. Wh... Free Essays on International Business ADCP International Marketing/Special Studies 1. a. Customers are the focal point of all marketing activities. Organizations have to define products not as what they make or produce but as what they do to satisfy customers. Marketing Barbie dolls would require a marketer to consider the socioculture of its consumers. Sociocultural forces are the influences in a society and its culture that bring about change in attitudes, beliefs, norms, customs, and lifestyles. There are three issues that need to be addressed in decided who will purchase a Barbie doll in international markets. First, there are constant changes in population demographic characteristics-age, gender, race, and ethnicity. The U. S. has entered into another baby boom, with 76 million Americans aged 18 or younger. Other nations may have this same occurrence and this information would help in directing attention to those areas that have a high representation of children wanting a Barbie doll. Another population trend is the increasing multicultural nature of U .S. society. The number of immigrants into the United States has steadily risen during the last thirty years, thus, the emergence of cultures emulating the U.S. Another thing to consider would be the modification of marketing practices to reach ethnically diverse customers to eliminate language barriers. Second, cultural values need to be addressed so that marketers can try to monitor changes in consumers’ needs for Barbie dolls and its products (clothes, accessories, etc.) in the near future. For instance, Barbie dolls were very popular when I was younger (not that I played with them, I had a sister) and today, they are not because of increased competition of other toy and doll makers. Video games have also become very popular in favor of toys. b. When marketing beer internationally, a marketer may have to consider the political/legal environment of the country they are trying to solicit. Some politic...

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

How to Organize Compare-Contrast Paragraphs

How to Organize Compare-Contrast Paragraphs Organizing two compare-and-contrast paragraphs is just a mini version of creating a compare-and-contrast essay. This kind of essay examines two or more subjects by comparing their similarities and contrasting their differences.  In the same way, compare-contrast paragraphs compare and contrast two things in two separate paragraphs. There are two basic methods for organizing compare-contrast paragraphs: the block format and a format where the writer separates similarities and differences. Block Format When using the block format for a two-paragraph comparison, discuss one subject in the first paragraph and the other in the second, as follows: Paragraph 1: The opening sentence names the two subjects and states that they are very similar, very different or have many important (or interesting) similarities and differences. The remainder of the paragraph describes the features of the first subject without referring to the second subject. Paragraph 2: The opening sentence must contain a transition showing you are comparing the second subject to the first, such as: Unlike (or similar to) subject No. 1, subject No. 2... Discuss all the features of subject No. 2 in relation to subject No. 1 using compare-contrast cue words such as  like,  similar to, also, unlike, and on the other hand,  for each comparison. End this paragraph with a personal statement, a prediction or another enlightening conclusion. Separating Similarities and Differences When using this format, discuss only the similarities in the first paragraph and only the differences in the next. This format requires careful use of many compare-contrast cue words and is, therefore, more difficult to write well. Create the paragraphs as follows: Paragraph 1: The opening sentence names the two subjects and states that they are very similar, very different or have many important (or interesting) similarities and differences. Continue discussing similarities only using compare-contrast cue words such as like, similar to and also, for each comparison. Paragraph 2: The opening sentence must contain a transition showing that you are pivoting to discussing differences, such as: Despite all these similarities, (these two subjects) differ in significant ways. Then describe all the differences, using compare-contrast cue words such as differs, unlike, and on the other hand, for each comparison. End the paragraph with a personal statement, a prediction, or another compelling conclusion. Create a Pre-Writing Chart In organizing compare-contrast paragraphs, using either of the above methods, students may find it helpful to create a compare-contrast-prewriting chart. To create this chart, students would create a three-column table or chart with the following headers topping each column: Subject 1, Features, and Subject 2. Students then list the subjects and features in the appropriate columns. For example, a student might compare life in the city (Subject No. 1) vs. the country (Subject No. 2). To start, the student would list Entertainment, Culture, and Food, in the rows under the Features header. Then, next Entertainment, the student could list theaters, clubs under the City header and festivals, bonfires under the Country header. Next might be Culture in the Features column. Next to Culture, the student would list museums in the City column and historic places under the Country column, and so on. After compiling about seven or eight rows, the student can cross out the rows that seem least relevant. Crafting such a chart helps the student create an easy visual aid to help write the compare-contrast paragraphs for either of the previously discussed methods.

Sunday, February 16, 2020

Discourse community Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Discourse community - Essay Example All members in a discourse community have the required level of expertise in the common goal (â€Å"DePaul University† 1). A discourse community has an overlapping boundary, which allows most people to participate within and between various discourse communities (â€Å"DePaul University† 1). Various academic discourse communities exist in our schools that include mathematicians, engineers, and sportsmen, among other groups. Engineering Course Engineering is a defined discourse community where members have the required level of expertise in engineering to communicate and agree on certain goals and interests in the engineering field. Engineers have a unique language and genre, which helps them to communicate their common goals and unify their group. Moreover, engineers in the engineering discourse community have a common band that reinforces their relationships thus enhancing agreements on common goals and interests. The common band in engineering defines the difference b etween engineering and other discourse communities. Additionally, engineers share norms of "good writing" as a common goal in this discourse community. Notably, engineers use metaphors to unify and define this group. At the same time, the engineering discourse community uses specialized vocabulary in terms of jargons and terminologies to define this group and communicate the common goals in engineering. Only engineers can understand the vocabularies in this discourse community. The engineering discourse community also uses a specialized genre â€Å"verbal and non-verbal† to define this group, communicate the common goals and interests of this group, and unify the engineering discourse community. Specifically, metaphors and reports are the dominant genres and tools used in engineering discourse community to enhance communication among the members in this group. Indeed, the conduit metaphor is dominant among engineers where it basis communication on codes that allowing sharing of engineering information. The specialized genres in this discourse community are very important to engineers as they help them to communicate and present their ideas as well as organizing the data collected in this field. This helps engineers to pass engineering knowledge to future engineers. Engineers must follow certain guidelines in writing an engineering report. Notably, the norms of "good writing, vocabularies, and specialized genres help in bringing engineers together in this discourse community. Supervisor in Electronic Company An electronic company deals in the production and supply of electronic products like bulbs, circuits, vacuum tubes, and diodes. A supervisor in an electronic company will play the role of overseeing the operations in the company where electricians are the main members in the electrical discourse community. Members in the electrical discourse community have the required level of knowledge in electronics that allows them to communicate and agree on cer tain goals and interests in this field. The electricians adopt a common language, writing skill, and genres, which defines and unifies this group. This discourse community has a common band that defines this group and allows electricians to communicate their common goals. The band strengthens the relationships within the electronic company

Sunday, February 2, 2020

Assignment about two questions Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

About two questions - Assignment Example s source code integrity must be maintained, there should be no discrimination of any kind to anyone using the software, the software must be distributed with distribution licence, the license must not be tied to a specific product, and finally, the licence must be technology – neutral. Sme of the vailabel open source software include Apache HTTP server, GNOME desktop Environment, GIMP image Editor, Firefox we browser, Android smartphone operating system, MYSQL database, PHP among others. Most of open source software are reliable. The reliability of open source software is due to the fact that all open source software are peer reviewed. This has made open source software to be to be more reliable and robust even in the most stringent conditions. The use of most open source software is safe. Once the initial source code of a particular software has been, the community of open source developers take up the project to review and correct any available bugs. This removes all security holes thus making the software more secure. Also, in cases where a security vulnerability has been identified, it’s quickly fixed by the open source community. Most of the open source software are released free of charge. The only costs that may be incurred include the customization costs and maybe the downloading costs. This makes the acquiring and the use of open source cheaper as compared to closed source software software. The availability of open source software makes it easy for one to evaluate the software. For instance, it can be assessed to determine if it has the expected requirement. For instance, just by evaluating the source code, one is able to determine if the software is secure or it has security holes. Open source software are being faced by overall disadvantage. Most of the open source software are not straightforward to use. Tis attributed to the fact that the developers of the system give less attention in the development of user interface. Nowadays, most

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Contrast The Representation Of Friday In Foe And Robinson Crusoe English Literature Essay

Contrast The Representation Of Friday In Foe And Robinson Crusoe English Literature Essay According to G Scott Bishop, it is important to read post-colonial literature in English, and see the reactions to the discussion of colonialism held by the English, as they reflect the way our historical actions created the world. Taking the plot of the father of the novel (Judith Hawley, spoken, 7th October 2010), and a novel focussed around colonialism, Robinson Crusoe, the post-colonial Foe deconstructs it to expose the lies and injustices that are seen in Robinson Crusoe, but never challenged. The change in cultural norms, from Britain in 1719 to South Africa in 1986 has been vast, and the challenging differences between the two novels purported to tell the same story is shocking. The central point of these differences is not, as some would suggest, Susan Barton, the interloper character, and female narrator, but more Friday, a character who is the same across the books, and yet incredibly different. Defoe used Friday to explore themes of religion, slavery and subjugation, all o f which were supposed to a natural state of being at that time in history, and Coetzee uses him to explore more strongly themes of slavery, black identity, and the voice of the oppressed. In neither book is Friday left simply to be a character, he is instead always used as a device through which the reader can explore other topics. Your master says the slavers cut [your tongue] out; but I have never heard of such a practiceà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦ Is it the truth that your master cut it out himself and blamed the slavers? (Coetzee, J.M, Foe.) The fact that this question is never answered, and that all attempts to force Friday to communicate fail drastically leave the reader wondering whether the slavers that captured Friday removed his tongue, or whether that was done by the colonialist Cruso, who felt there was no need of a great stock of words, (Coetzee, J.M, Foe). This contrasts vastly with Defoes Crusoe, who said I began to keep my journal; of which I shall here give you the copy (though in it will be told all these particulars over again) as long as it lasted; for having no more ink, I was forced to leave it off. This implies clearly that Defoes Crusoe gave a lot more care and interest to language than Coetzees Cruso. Defoes Crusoe, much as he appreciated journaling in his own language whilst alone, also took pleasure in teaching Friday to speak, In a little time I began to speak to him; and teach him to speak to meà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦ I likewise taught him to say Master; and then let him know that was to be my name: I likewise taught him to say Yes and No and to know the meaning of them. Defoes Crusoe was certainly concerned with language, but never investigated the language that was Fridays own, erasing Fridays history by naming him, and teaching him English. In this way, he could only voice the thoughts that Crusoe had given him language to speak. This was challenged by the voiceless Friday in Coetzees work, a character who literally couldnt speak. In this, it could be argued that Coetzee was asserting that it was not his right to give voice to an oppressed black character, and let Friday stand for the victims of apartheid and slavery, where Defoe (due to the beliefs of society at his time) believed that it was right and natural for Crusoe to claim the position of Master to Friday, and to speak for him. Hearing the voice of the ethnic minorities in both Foe and Robinson Crusoe is important, but so is acknowledging their different racial identities. Friday in Foes work, in standing for the victims of apartheid and slavery, is a black African character he was black, negro, with a head of fuzzy wool (Coetzees Foe), whereas Crusoes Friday, not standing for those causes, is portrayed as being an anglicised version of a Caribbean man, who had all the sweetness and softness of a European in his countenance. This implies that Friday was somehow better than the average Caribbean tribesman by dint of looking somewhat European, but at the same time, the first language Crusoe taught him was that he was his master. He was an improvement on the average savage, since his appearance was somewhat European, but still his race left him to be the natural servant of Crusoe. This Friday is very much a dramatic device used to portray Crusoes development as a religious man; [Crusoe] began to instruct him [ Friday] in the knowledge of the true God. This allowed Defoe to expand on Crusoes earlier mentions of religion, in his conversion, and in the hegemony of the time, caused Crusoe to be seen as a good and moral character, who treated his slave well, and brought him up to be religious (McInelly Colonialism, the novel and Robinson Crusoe). In Coetzees work, Friday is allowed to be sullen and unpleasant, easy to see, but hard to like, he is created to be the embodiment of all the oppression experienced by a racial group, to only be able to take in, never to give out ideas or understanding, to be central to a story he can have no part in. The silence of Coetzees Friday could also be said to reflect the reader, who, like Friday can only react and respond to situations. Katherine Wagner however argues against this, saying that criticism and silence are mutually exclusive terms. Coetzees Friday can only be silenced, but Defoes Friday has no room to criticise, and no part in making decisions for Crusoe, because in that time, a slave wouldnt have that option at all, Coetzees Friday can take no part, being unable to speak. His isolation and treatment as second class is made far more visible by his disability, a device Coetzee used to avoid speaking the black voice, as a privileged white man, whilst still drawing attention to the plight of slaves. Crusoe, Cruso and Barton were all seen to treat Friday very differently, but all see him as a possession in their own way. Crusoe did this most blatantly, in claiming, naming Friday and instructing him to call him Master, with Defoes Friday being portrayed as making signs of subjection, servitude, and submission to Crusoe without even any bidding. This added to the moral message of Robinson Crusoe, because it showed the savage being tamed, and later taught religion. This contrasts strongly with the Cruso created by Coetzee, who was sullen (J M Coetzee, Foe) in his service, who obeyed Cruso, but did not have the childish excitement or comically expressed pidgin (Chris Boignes, Lost in a maze of doubtin) portrayed in places by Defoe. Barton also claimed him, despite trying to treat him as an individual if Friday is not mine to set free, whose is he (J M Coetzee, Foe), and on some level saw him clearly as her property, forgetting that maybe it was not her right to set him free either. ( Chris Boignes, Lost in a maze of doubtin). The representation of Friday in these two texts is vastly different, and one could hardly believe that the two were in fact the same character. With different histories, and different personalities, in fact all both have in common is playing the role of the non-white slave in the text, to serve a literary purpose, in both reflecting the views of wider society towards non-white people, and in showing the development of other characters. This is not to say that either Friday was one-dimensional, in particular Coetzees Friday was multi-dimensional and complex, but more that despite the character complexity, despite his being resistant to being interpreted (Bishop C Scott, J. M. Coetzees Foe), and how central they were, both were created to serve only a purpose. 1. Bishop, C. Scott. J. M. Coetzees Foe. World Literature Today 64.1 (1990): 54. Print. http://www.jstor.org/sici?origin=sfx:sfxsici=0196-3570(1990)64:1%3C54:JMC%22%3E2.0.CO;2-H 2. Wagner, KM. Dichter and Dichtung + Foe by Coetzee, John Susan Barton and the truth of autobiography. English studies in Africa 32.1 (1989): 1-11. Print. http://pao.chadwyck.co.uk/articles/displayItem.do?QueryType=articlesResultsID=12B06460CF2F1F413filterSequence=0ItemNumber=1journalID=4273 3. Joanna Scott. Voice and trajectory: An interview with J. M. Coetzee Salmagundi.114/115 (1997): 82.22. Print.  Ã‚  Ã‚   http://lion.chadwyck.co.uk/searchFulltext.do?id=R01511343divLevel=0area=abellforward=critref_ft 4. Bongie, Chris. Lost in the Maze of Doubtin: J. M. Coetzees Foe and the Politics of (Un)Likeness. Modern Fiction Studies 39.2 (1993): 261-0. Print. http://pao.chadwyck.co.uk/PDF/1286892456412.pdf 5. Brett C McInelly. Expanding Empires, Expanding Selves: Colonialism, the Novel, and Robinson Crusoe. Studies in the Novel 35.1 (2003): 1. Print.   http://lion.chadwyck.co.uk/searchFulltext.do?id=R01665469divLevel=0area=abellforward=critref_ft 6. Cohen, D. Fashioning Friday (Robinson Crusoe). Queens Quarterly 115.1 (2008): 9-11. Print.   http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-179351988.html 7. Wheeler, Roxann. My Savage, My Man: Racial Multiplicity in Robinson Crusoe. ELH 62.4 (1995): 821. Print.  Ã‚  Ã‚   http://www.jstor.org/sici?origin=sfx:sfxsici=0013-8304(1995)62:4%3C821:SMRM%3E2.0.CO;2-Q 8. Ritchie, DE. Robinson Crusoe as Narrative Theologian. Renascence essays on values in literature 49.2 (1997): 94-17. Print. http://find.galegroup.com/shax/retrieve.do?contentSet=IAC-DocumentsresultListType=RESULT_LISTqrySerId=Locale(en,,):FQE%3D(tx,None,39)robinson+crusoe+as+narrative+theologian$sgHitCountType=NoneinPS=truesort=DateDescendsearchType=AdvancedSearchFormtabID=T013prodId=SHAXsearchId=R1currentPosition=1userGroupName=rho_ttdadocId=A19983243docType= 9. Donoghue, Frank. Inevitable Politics: Rulership and Identity in Robinson Crusoe. Studies in the Novel 27.1 (1995): 1-0. Print http://lion.chadwyck.co.uk/searchFulltext.do?id=R01532799divLevel=0area=abellforward=critref_ft 10. Ngugi Wa Thiongo. The language of African literature. Decolonising the Mind. London / Portsmouth N.H James Currey / Heinemann 1986 11. Judith Hawley Robinson Crusoe (University Lecture) 7th October 2010

Friday, January 17, 2020

Drama In Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Essay

A very living and breathing drama of life is painted in â€Å"Road Not Taken† that presents a situation in which speaker is caught in a decision-making dilemma. The setting of the poem presents the speaker t a bifurcation of road where he must decide which trail to take. He can not make out where either road leads. He looks at the physical aspects of the road and decides to travel on the less-traveled road. The poem symbolizes the underlying theme of choice-making and speaker’s individuality in prefer a less-common way. It further implies that decision-making must not be procrastinated because it is more harmful than the outcome of an endeavor. Furthermore, in manifest that there is no absolute choice available to human being and he has to prefer one choice over the other provided and governed by destiny. The only distinction that poet has, is his preference of less-common choice. Although whole poem is an extended metaphor of life where one comes across many occasions when he has to make decisions but Frost introduces various metaphorical expression to convey the intensity of the situation. In the very first line, Robert Frost brings in the primary metaphor, the diverging roads. Fist line introduces the dilemma of diverging road while in line 2-3 poet shows the limitations of physical being and regrets over human incapability to travel on both road. â€Å"Long I stood† depicts that he did take the impulsive decision and took his time to make decision. Lines 4-10 depict his comparative examination of both roads. He again refers to human incapacity when he acknowledges that his vision is inadequate. Next two lines resonate the past feeling as he finds the both road â€Å"really about the same†. In 13-15, he makes his decision whereas lines five lines, he visualizes himself in future, talking about his decision to go on the less-traveled path.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   The tone of the poem is meditative because speaker contemplates on his options. He has to take into account the characteristics of each road. There is an element of regret also as he can not travel on both road but poems ends on an optimistic not as poet thinks that traveling on less-traveled road will make the difference. He signifies the importance of his individuality that compels him to move on a less-trodden path. He does not adopt the ordinary path in the mundane activities of life.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   The structure of the poem has a peculiar importance and is constructed on four stanzas with five lines each. The first stanza presents the dilemma; second stanza symbolizes the choices available to the speaker. Third stanza manifests his regret over not taking the other road whereas fourth road depicts the decision of the poet to take the less traveled road. There is sign of exclamation after line 13 that indicates the excitement on decision to keep the first path for another day but this excitement soon dies out as he doubts that whether he will come back. In lines 18 and 19, there is repetition of â€Å"I† that denotes the emphasis on â€Å"his† decision to move on less traveled trail. Rhyme scheme of the poem is abaabcdccd†¦Frost uses simple diction that conveys his message with comprehensive.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   So as a whole, this poem uses different poetical tools to describe the psychological dilemma of the poet in decision-making. His experience is not subjective but is of universal nature and he presents it in a subtle way.

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Important Symbols in Lord of the Flies by William Golding

In William Golding’s novel Lord of the Flies, he uses unique elements to symbolize many concepts throughout the story. The two most important but differing symbols used throughout the novel are the Conch and Sow’s head symbolically used by the author to demonstrate the transition of good to evil as the darkness of savagery slowly begins to powerfully overtake the boys’ mental concept of their civilian nature that they were born into. Both symbolically represent a certain importance and power to the boys as they fight to maintain order and civility on the island while trying to contain control over the group of young boys as they begin to abandon all ties to their once civilized life and mindset that they once knew. Isolation and daily struggles to survive on the island lead to the transition to killing and becoming more barbaric. The taste of killing and power becomes an overpowering obsession that the boys cannot consciously control. Lord of the Flies is a novel using different elements to show symbolism of different people in society and their reactions when cut off from the world and left to survive on their own. The conch and sow’s head are used as power over the group of boys. Jack Uses the conch to try and keep everyone working together, while Jack uses the sow’s head to threaten and show that meat and killing is the only importance in staying alive. Both boys have two different concepts and mental thinking of how things should be run on the island. Jack and Ralph’sShow MoreRelatedThe Powers of the Symbols in Lord of the Flies929 Words   |  4 PagesLord of the Flies is a novel that is all about symbols that have different powers which is used on the boys. Two of the symbols which are the conch and the sow’s head contain powers that are opposite of each other and they have a great affect on the boys. Lord of the Flies would be a different story without symbols. The conch has the powers that lead to civilization and order. It represents the authority that the boys will need to get rescued from the island. The sow’s head on the other hand representsRead MoreLord Of The Flies : Representation Of Violence And War1611 Words   |à ‚  7 PagesLord Of The Flies: Representation Of Violence and War Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a German theologian, states that â€Å" The ultimate test of a moral society is the kind of world that it leaves to its children.† In William Golding’s Lord Of The Flies, societal topics run rampant throughout the text with Golding’s use of individuals to represent different aspects of society. Many writers view the Lord Of The Flies as an allegory, as societal topics such as politics make appearances throughout the text. InRead MoreWilliam Golding s Lord Of The Flies 1299 Words   |  6 PagesKanak Garg Mr. Fraser English 10 Honors, Period 6 19 December 2014 Savagery in Civilization: Symbolism in Lord of the Flies Symbolism as defined by the Merriam Webster Dictionary, is â€Å"the use of symbols to express or represent ideas or qualities in literature, art, etc.† (â€Å"Symbolism†). For this reason, symbolism is utilized in literature in order to make novels more interesting and convey notions that are usually either highly controversial or extremely philosophical. For example in the popularRead MoreLord Of The Flies Symbolism Essay1080 Words   |  5 PagesLord of the Flies Essay â€Å"Maybe there is a beast†¦ maybe its only us.†(Golding [Page 50]) The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, is a novel that goes much deeper than a group of 12 year old boys stranded on an island. Throughout the book Golding portrays symbols and constant themes which show how he feels about the human race; that there is an inner beast inside everyone and no matter who you are, it will eventually get exposed. Golding also shows symbols throughout the book which represent theRead MoreLord Of The Flies Pig Head Analysis1023 Words   |  5 Pages2017 The Symbolic Meaning of the Lord of the Flies â€Å"We are civilized people, which means that we are all savages at heart but observing a few amenities of civilized behaviour.† Tennessee Williams, a prize winning playwright once stated about civilized humans. In the book Lord of the Flies by William Golding this quote depicts what the book is trying to point out and display to us. The quote ties in with the pig head on a stick, otherwise known as the Lord of the Flies. The pig head was killed barbaricallyRead MoreLord of the Flies, by William Golding1055 Words   |  5 Pages In William Goldings Lord of the Flies a group of English school boys crash land onto an uninhabited island somewhere in the Mid Atlantic ocean. Ralph, the protagonist and also the elected leader, tries to maintain peace and avoid any calamity on the island. However, Jack is neither willing to contribute nor listen because he is jealous of Ralph and has a sickening obsession with killing boars. Ralph has some good traits that help him maintain pea ce and balance for a period of time. He is charismaticRead MoreLord of the Flies a Microcosm to Our Society1306 Words   |  4 PagesWilliam Golding s novel Lord of the Flies significantly symbolizes characters, objects and the setting to represent our world as a whole. Golding uses those symbols to make the island similar to society and to show the difference between living in a civilised society and savagery. The novel takes place on an island during World War II, this is significant since the isolation forms a sort of civilization and community, a sort of microcosm to the real world and to human civilization. Lord of the FliesRead MoreLord Of The Flies Film Analysis1084 Words   |  5 Pagesconsist of many compelling qualities in order for it to be adapted into a film. Lord of the Flies most definitely has these qualities like a strong conflict, interesting plot, and many literature techniques. Peter Brook created a film adaptation of Lord of the Flies in 1963. Peter Brook, director of the Lord of the flies film, did a commendable job of making the movie as similar as possible to the novel by William Golding. There are still a few key differences that make the novel much more compellingRead MoreSymbolic Elements in The Lord of the Flies by William Golding560 Words   |  3 PagesIn the novel Lord of the Flies by William Golding the stranded boys come into contact with some particular elements that represent an idea which are called symbols. These symbols include the beast which represents the fear of the unknown and the darkness of mankind. The second symbol is the signal fire which rep resents hope. The third symbol is the conch shell which represents order. Golding indicates that when man is taken out of civilization, they have a natural instinct is to become evil, darknessRead MoreWilliam Goldings Lord of the Flies Essay1255 Words   |  6 Pagesever since they were born, or would they disregard all of it and do as they please because there is no definite authority figure to tell them how to live. In William Goldings, The Lord of the Flies, he brilliantly tells a story of life and death and everything in between. His use of symbolism with the conch, beast, and lord of the flies is phenomenal. It is a story that makes you think. Every person, when faced with reality, may act civil now, but in a survival situation, human nature takes over